Friday, July 23, 2010

What’s the Web Saying About Turfgrass, 7-23-10 Edition



Summer stresses are in full swing right now. The dog days of summer are upon us. Hang on for the ride, September 1 is only 39 days away!

Here is your list of links to articles regarding turf. Have a great weekend!

Do you care for the environment? Golf courses have long been perceived as environmental wastelands that use high amounts of chemicals and way too much water. Maybe golf is such a traditional game that even its managers are afraid of change? If we want golf to thrive in the future we need to change the way we do things so that the game is able to sustain itself. http://www.golfcourseindustry.com/gci-060710-guest-column-environment.aspx


Natural turfgrass keeps giving and giving. We all know that natural turfgrass provides numerous environmental benefits but not many people know that the growing and harvesting of turfgrass sod also plays a role in good stewardship. Although some casual observers might think that turfgrass sod producers are selling their farms an inch at a time, research suggests they are actually “growing” more topsoil as a result of sound farming practices and the natural growth characteristics of turfgrass. http://www.landscapemanagement.net/athletic-turf-core-pages/natural-turfgrass-keeps-giving-and-giving


Feeling the Heat. Course Conditions Suffering in the Midwest. The combined number of 90-degree days over the last two years was much less than the annual average in just one season. With plenty of moisture and the absence of intense heat, Poa annua populations increased on many courses. Unfortunately, Poa annua declines much faster than bentgrass during weather extremes, which is why it fell prey to winterkill damage this winter and why it appears to be fading during this summer's heat. http://www.usga.org/course_care/regional_updates/regional_reports/midcontinent/Feeling-The-Heat---July-2010/


A Penny Saved is a Penny Earned. The name of the game for golf courses in these recessionary times is to keep the current standards and find ways to do so by spending less money. Managing energy costs is a complex subject, but getting started is easy. The remainder of this article will demonstrate why an energy audit is worthwhile and how someone can begin the process. Potential items to evaluate will be reviewed. Most important of all, this article will serve to help you begin the process. http://turf.lib.msu.edu/gsr/2010s/2010/100528.pdf


Turfgrass as a sustainable part of the landscape. Dr. Charles Peacock, professor of crop science at N.C. State University, explains why turf grass plays a role in sustainable landscaping. Peacock offered these remarks during a July 12, 2010, presentation to the John Locke Foundation's Shaftesbury Society. Watch full-length JLF presentations here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jpAK8rh3my0


ND golf course goes green with goats. Five weed-gulping goats are being used this summer at a Bismarck golf course to rid hillsides of undesirable vegetation. http://www.thedickinsonpress.com/event/apArticle/id/D9H1EBK00/


Marcus Jones
Graduate Research Assistant

2 comments:

psjhawk said...

Marcus: Nice work! Really like this update format.

Pat Jones
Golf Course Industry magazine

Marcus Jones said...

Pat,

Thanks for the comment. Glad to see that you're enjoying the blog.

Marcus